Monday , July 6 2020

NOW IS THE PERFECT TIME FOR SEEDING AND TRANSPLANTING

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Finally, we can cut off all the dead stuff, but do this step by step down the branch so you are sure that the inner green cambium survives to remove new leaves!

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Starting seeds in packs of 6 (2 seeds in each cell, cut to the strongest, like salad and spinach) and 4-inch containers (for transplanting into small clumps for variations such as parsley and coriander. They are in a bowl to absorb the drained 1/4 inch irrigation water that is absorbed because the potting soil needs it within a few days.

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An avocado planted in late June.

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More sun allowed in September.

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Now milder autumn sun can absorb in October.

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Dry material left over from filtering out the “finished” compost to distribute on beds of manure and coffee grounds before planting seeds and seedlings – after waiting 2 weeks for the changes to warm and cool. If you don’t wait before transplanting, you run the risk of literally burning the roots of the seedlings. This dry stuff will be the basis of a new compost heap that alternates with layers of damp green and old potting soil.

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As with other autumn pears, eucomas occur as soon as the daylight shifts and the heat subsides.

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A green eukom in the ground.

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& # 39; Whitewater & # 39; -Acanthus – Bear Breeches – Leaves appear and dispel my fears that he died in this terrible heat!

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Gomphrena globosa & # 39; fireworks & # 39;

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Furcrea “fruits” that had fallen from the flower stalk are potted and rooted.

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Shares sprouted from a leaky faucet are potted and thriving despite their scarce roots.

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Tiny yellow bell-shaped flowers on asparagus ferns. Stack the ripeness and compost to feed the roots so that they plant a lot of shoots in spring.

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& # 39; Carrion Flower & # 39; attracts flies, but they are beautiful one-day bloomers. The long white seed coat has expelled its seed.

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Blooming day lily.

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Many onions send out foliage after the amount of daylight and warmth has changed.

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Sunflowers still in bloom and remains of amaranth.

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Salvia & # 39; Spotlight & # 39;

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Leonitus leonurus – lion tail, lion mane. I prefer this bright orange variety over the more beige ones.

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Love this bougainvillea!

Our current autumn weather, daytime temperatures in the mid to upper 70s, nighttime temperatures in the high 50s and many scattered clouds during the day are perfect for growing new plants in our gardens, be it from seeds or transplants. We can enjoy being outside in the garden again, cleaning up after this hot heat and starting our plantings to eat and enjoy color in the fall, winter and early spring.

Cut off the burned leaves
After all, it’s safe to cut back the dead stuff and promote new growth.
Gradually cut back what is obviously dead, as some of the branches with crispy leaves may still be green on the inside.
If the layer just beneath the outer bark – the cambium layer – is green, this may sprout again, if not until spring. You want to cut away the dead stuff, but only to the top of the knot so that a new leaf can be created later.
When new sprouts come from the base of the stem or stem, as one of my cherries and a rose do, cut all of this away, as far down in the ground as it comes out of the stem or trunk as possible. This growth comes from the rhizome and bears no fruit or flowers that you want. So remove it as soon as you see it grow back. You want the plant’s energy to instead grow into the growth that bears the fruits and flowers for which you bought it.

Some seeding tips

  • Sow root vegetable seeds – such as beets, carrots, radishes, beets, rutabagas – right where they ripen. They can be distributed in the entire bed or container at a distance of about 1 cm. Your tap roots must be able to extend directly into the prepared bed. As they ripen, thin by pulling out some of the crowded tiny plants for salads so the remaining roots can fully ripen. When they are initially transplanted from another location, especially 6-packs or 4-inch pots, their roots are curly and have difficulty maturing properly.
  • Sow vegetable seeds that are cut and come again – such as lettuce, mesclun, parsley, coriander – by sprinkling them on the prepared bed so that each seed is about 1/4 inch apart. Harvest by cutting just above the ground and repeating every month as the leaves regrow.
  • For vegetable seeds such as Bok Choy, Swiss chard, lettuce, spinach and Tatsoi, which you later want to transplant into a growing bed so that they develop full heads, you can sow them tightly in seed trays, 6-packs or in a prepared bed, especially for later transplanting .
  • Edible peas and sweet peas can be sown together, either mixed or on opposite sides of a trellis. Although the pea pods are poisonous, they are so characteristic that there is no problem confusing them. Edible pods are large, light green and smooth. Pea pods are narrower, grayer and more hairy. Edible pea pods that you want to harvest at a stage of immaturity. Pea pods that you want to let dry until they are thoroughly crispy for later sowing.
  • Repeat sowing of the seeds about every three weeks to ensure good germination. Later sowings will catch up with earlier ones. A few years ago my peas finally found the fourth sowing. So keep trying – at some point the seeds will finally react to the ideal environment.
  • Flower seeds can be started or transplanted either by sprinkling or in containers when they are about 2 to 4 inches tall.
  • Wildflower seeds are best distributed on weed and damp beds, but without the addition of fertilizer. After sowing, spray the seed bed lightly with water and every 3 or 4 days for the next few weeks so that the seed bed remains slightly moist so that the seeds can germinate.

Some transplant tips

  • Prepare growing beds by working compost, liquid manure and coffee grounds – each about 5 cm – into the soil to a depth of at least 5 cm to feed the entire root profile.
  • Space transplants of vegetables such as Bok Choy, Swiss chard, lettuce, spinach and Tatsoi closely related. You only need about 3 to 4 inches between plants because you repeatedly harvest only the outer leaves instead of letting the plants fully ripen. This way you may have tender “gourmet” green for 6 months instead of a flood of overripe vegetables until next spring!
  • Bury plants of the cabbage family such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower up to their first leaves to stabilize their heavy tips. The hard cuticles of their stems prevent the buried stems from rotting.
  • The California natives thrive in “indigenous” soils that are as unfertilized and not composted as possible. Loosen the bottom of the hole a foot wide, but only as deep as the root ball. Fill the empty hole with water and let it drain. Push the plant into the hole and disturb the root ball as little as possible, but with a few scratches on the outer surface to loosen the root tips and encourage them to expand into the new soil. Fill the hole with the original bottom. Water into the plant to fully saturate the root ball and loose soil so they are in good contact. Then do not water for several weeks. Hopefully the autumn rain will gain the upper hand and will hardly keep the soil moist so that the roots can anchor themselves in their new home soil.

About Christian

Christian Joshua Ferguson is a local activist who enjoys walking, social media and jigsaw puzzles. He is entertaining and smart, but can also be very greedy and a bit lazy. he also likes to write about plants

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