Monday , July 6 2020

August has become mild – Phew!

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Amarcrinum loves the heat.

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The spots of the sugar cane begonia emphasize together with its bright pink bloom

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Purple stems and ridges contrast with light pink flowers

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Gomphrena globosa & # 39; fireworks & # 39; pink pompoms

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Zephyr pumpkin from Nichols Garden Nursery in Albany Oregon

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Load celebrity tomatoes with fruit again

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Put jujube fruits – they turn brown and shrink as “Chinese dates”. Until then, they are crispy.

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The day lily always comes with several flowers, each lasting one day

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Succulent that also loves the heat

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Newly planted avocado protected from intense sun

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Umbrellas protect plants from the midday sun

How beautiful this mild weather has become! I hardly got used to days with low 80 degrees and evenings with low 60 degrees. And the garden tells me that he loves change too – lush foliage, flowers, new shoots in branches that have been burned by this hot heat. Life starts all over again!

Time to prune the dead stuff
Now you can start cutting away those fried leaves. But just cut the obviously dead stuff.
Gradually cut down a branch until you see some green in the branch. At this point, just cut to just above the next knot, leaving less than a quarter of an inch stub.
The knot is the place where new leaves or branches are regenerated.

Sow another batch of pumpkin, cucumber and beans
Prepare new spaces in your floor for another batch of vegetables that will ripen within 2 months to continue the fresh harvests until the cooler weather begins.
I am eating my third batch of this vegetable and will plant another batch tonight. As soon as the current plants bear fruit, the newly sown batch begins to plant their fruit.
This summer I harvested tender vegetables at the right time, which I prefer, and switched from one planting to the next without having to cut production, ripen or endure too many at the same time.

Tomatoes start to bloom and fruit again
Flowering stops when the air temperature rises above 95 degrees. During this heat attack in early July, of course, we didn’t get any flowers or fruits.
After the air temperatures remained below 85-90 ° C for a few weeks, the plants started to bloom again.
Some of these fruits are ripening now, with more coming in the next month. Fresh tomatoes at last!
Of course, this intense heat was too much for some plants. My two Paul Robesons, who had borne 42 huge, delicious, brownish-reddish-purple fruits between June 28 and July 26, were completely finished. Wonderfully aromatic and productive that I will grow again!
My four celebrities, who bore 40 fruits between June 28 and August 21, now have another dozen green or ripening fruits on each plant. Definitely a wonderful producer of delicious, medium-sized to large fruits, which I will continue on my list “Always plants”.
So far I have harvested 148 fruits. Surprisingly, both Sungold and Isis Candy weren’t big producers this year. Their plants were robust, so maybe I gave them a couple of handfuls of fertilizer each, and the nitrogen produced vigorous plants, but not enough phosphorus and potassium to produce fruit.

Save seeds?
Let the stalks dry completely until they are crispy. If they can bend at all and do not break off immediately, they are not dry enough.
You want to make sure that the seeds are fully mature so that they germinate well and produce strong new plants.
If you are concerned that seed pods will burst open and spread their seeds before harvesting, tie a paper bag – not plastic – over the seed head and let the plant dry out further.
This can be difficult if the plant has a long flowering, blooming and setting time, if there are both flowers and green seeds and dry seeds on the plant.

About Christian

Christian Joshua Ferguson is a local activist who enjoys walking, social media and jigsaw puzzles. He is entertaining and smart, but can also be very greedy and a bit lazy. he also likes to write about plants

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